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Peter Howson
Set in the early 1950s, A Hero of the People tells the story of a British boxer Randolph Turpin and his doomed attempt to defend his world-title against the previous champion, a flamboyant American called Sugar Ray Robinson. It opens with an account of his sending off at Southampton; describes the voyage across the Atlantic, in the course of which his is fed spiked drinks by two gangsters in the pay of his manager; and climaxes with a long description of the fight itself, in which – still feeling the ill-effects of the alcohol – he is defeated. In the early 1980’s Howson made a number of drawing of boxers influenced by his time in the Army but it was not until 1985, when he was artist in residence at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, that the figure of the boxer came to assume a central place in his work.
Technique

A black-and-white linocut printed on 300gsm Somerset White Textured from a series of 16 prints titled A Hero of the People published in 1987 by The Paragon Press.



Peter Howson
Peter Howson (born in 1959 in London) moved to Scotland with his family aged four. After serving as an infantryman with The Royal Highland Fusiliers he left to study at the Glasgow School of Art. Appointed an official War Artist during the Bosnian Civil War in 1993, he produced controversial images of atrocities described to him at first hand by the victims. His work has often represented images of working-class machismo in intense situations, such as the boxing linocuts offered here.

Availability: In stock

£600.00

A Hero of the People (3)

A Hero of the People 3

A Hero of the People (3)

Linocut
The artist cuts into the surface of a piece of lino with a simple gouge, knife or engraver’s tool. The surface of the lino is inked and printed: this can be done by passing it through a press, though it can also be done manually by rubbing the paper onto the lino with a spoon or a similar implement.
Linocut
Edition of 40
Signed & numbered by the artist

£600.00

Sheet size
55 x 38.6cm
21¾ x 15¼in

Image size
40.5 x 29.8cm
15.9 x 11.7in
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A Hero of the People (3)
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Details

Set in the early 1950s, A Hero of the People tells the story of a British boxer Randolph Turpin and his doomed attempt to defend his world-title against the previous champion, a flamboyant American called Sugar Ray Robinson. It opens with an account of his sending off at Southampton; describes the voyage across the Atlantic, in the course of which his is fed spiked drinks by two gangsters in the pay of his manager; and climaxes with a long description of the fight itself, in which – still feeling the ill-effects of the alcohol – he is defeated. In the early 1980’s Howson made a number of drawing of boxers influenced by his time in the Army but it was not until 1985, when he was artist in residence at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, that the figure of the boxer came to assume a central place in his work.

Additional Information

First Name Peter
Last Name Howson
Artist Description Peter Howson (born in 1959 in London) moved to Scotland with his family aged four. After serving as an infantryman with The Royal Highland Fusiliers he left to study at the Glasgow School of Art. Appointed an official War Artist during the Bosnian Civil War in 1993, he produced controversial images of atrocities described to him at first hand by the victims. His work has often represented images of working-class machismo in intense situations, such as the boxing linocuts offered here.
Edition of 40
Ed Date 1987
Inscriptions Signed & numbered by the artist
Short Technique Linocut
Sheet Size 55 x 38.6cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 21¾ x 15¼in
Image Size 40.5 x 29.8cm
Image Size (inches) 15.9 x 11.7in
Technical Description

A black-and-white linocut printed on 300gsm Somerset White Textured from a series of 16 prints titled A Hero of the People published in 1987 by The Paragon Press.

Technique Pop ups The artist cuts into the surface of a piece of lino with a simple gouge, knife or engraver’s tool. The surface of the lino is inked and printed: this can be done by passing it through a press, though it can also be done manually by rubbing the paper onto the lino with a spoon or a similar implement.
Price on Application No
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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