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Alan Davie
Impromptus represent Davie's first foray into the etching technique and reflect his dazzling, spontaneous imagination. Forms and symbols are conjured out of Davie's unconscious and often allude to the religious and the sexual. Fleeting thoughts are captured in gestural marks on paper. He describes his approach to drawing as a method of 'unintentionalism'. This spontaneity is reflected in the series as a whole.
Technique
Etching, sugar-lift for black, flat aquatint for ochre and spitbite for red and green, printed on 310 gsm Somerset Tp paper. From a portfolio of 16 etchings published by The Paragon Press in 2003.

Alan Davie
Alan Davie (born September 28, 1920 in Grangemouth, Scotland died 2014) studied at Edinburgh College of Art in the late 1930s. In the post-war period he found himself greatly influenced by the ‘automatic’ techniques practised by the Surrealists in Europe and ‘action painters’ such as Jackson Pollock in the US as a way of releasing creativity hidden within. Davie draws from a wide range of sources ranging from Indian mythology, Zen Buddhism and African tribal sculpture to Australian Aboriginal art.

Availability: In stock

POA

Impromptus 2

Impromptus 2

Impromptus 2

Etching
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Etching
Edition of 25
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

POA

Sheet size
71.8 x 85.5cm
28¼ x 33in

Image size
55.5 x 70.5cm
21 x 27¾in


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Impromptus 2
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Details

Impromptus represent Davie's first foray into the etching technique and reflect his dazzling, spontaneous imagination. Forms and symbols are conjured out of Davie's unconscious and often allude to the religious and the sexual. Fleeting thoughts are captured in gestural marks on paper. He describes his approach to drawing as a method of 'unintentionalism'. This spontaneity is reflected in the series as a whole.

Additional Information

First Name Alan
Last Name Davie
Artist Description Alan Davie (born September 28, 1920 in Grangemouth, Scotland died 2014) studied at Edinburgh College of Art in the late 1930s. In the post-war period he found himself greatly influenced by the ‘automatic’ techniques practised by the Surrealists in Europe and ‘action painters’ such as Jackson Pollock in the US as a way of releasing creativity hidden within. Davie draws from a wide range of sources ranging from Indian mythology, Zen Buddhism and African tribal sculpture to Australian Aboriginal art.
Edition of 25
Ed Date 2003
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Etching
Sheet Size 71.8 x 85.5cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 28¼ x 33in
Image Size 55.5 x 70.5cm
Image Size (inches) 21 x 27¾in
Technical Description Etching, sugar-lift for black, flat aquatint for ochre and spitbite for red and green, printed on 310 gsm Somerset Tp paper. From a portfolio of 16 etchings published by The Paragon Press in 2003.
Technique Pop ups A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Price on Application Yes
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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