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Anish Kapoor
In this etching Kapoor uses the vocabulary of his drawings and preparatory sketches for his sculptures. The dark shape, in Kapoor's signature colour red, set against a fluorescent pink, recalls the organic form of his famous installation Marsyas in the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern in 2002. Intensity of colour, often using pure colour pigment, is a hallmark of Kapoor's work. The artist relished the challenge of achieving the same dramatic effects of colour and depth in the two-dimensional media of etching.
Technique
Etching, two plates: spit-bite aquatint and polymer gravure, printed on 300gsm Somerset Textured Soft White paper. From a portfolio of 12 colour etchings, published by The Paragon Press in 2007.

Anish Kapoor
Anish Kapoor CBE RA (born Mumbai 12 March 1954) is one of the most influential sculptors working today. Kapoor has lived and worked in London since the early 1970s when he studied art, first at the Hornsey College of Art and later at the Chelsea School of Art and Design. Winner of the 1991 Turner Prize, Kapoor has shown dynamic virtuosity in creating sculptures and installations in a wide range of materials and on scales extending from the conventional to the massive. Recent sculptural work has featured the use of red wax to convey organic and visceral resonances. A spiralling 115-metre sculpture has been chosen as the monument to mark the London 2012 Olympic Games.

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POA

12 Etchings (No 9)

12 Etchings (Number 9)

12 Etchings (No 9)

Etching
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Etching
Edition of 40
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

POA

Sheet size
77 x 89.9cm
30¼ x 35¼ in

Image size
52.5 x 66.3cm
20¾ x 26in


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12 Etchings (No 9)
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Details

In this etching Kapoor uses the vocabulary of his drawings and preparatory sketches for his sculptures. The dark shape, in Kapoor's signature colour red, set against a fluorescent pink, recalls the organic form of his famous installation Marsyas in the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern in 2002. Intensity of colour, often using pure colour pigment, is a hallmark of Kapoor's work. The artist relished the challenge of achieving the same dramatic effects of colour and depth in the two-dimensional media of etching.

Additional Information

First Name Anish
Last Name Kapoor
Artist Description Anish Kapoor CBE RA (born Mumbai 12 March 1954) is one of the most influential sculptors working today. Kapoor has lived and worked in London since the early 1970s when he studied art, first at the Hornsey College of Art and later at the Chelsea School of Art and Design. Winner of the 1991 Turner Prize, Kapoor has shown dynamic virtuosity in creating sculptures and installations in a wide range of materials and on scales extending from the conventional to the massive. Recent sculptural work has featured the use of red wax to convey organic and visceral resonances. A spiralling 115-metre sculpture has been chosen as the monument to mark the London 2012 Olympic Games.
Edition of 40
Ed Date 2007
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Etching
Sheet Size 77 x 89.9cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 30¼ x 35¼ in
Image Size 52.5 x 66.3cm
Image Size (inches) 20¾ x 26in
Technical Description Etching, two plates: spit-bite aquatint and polymer gravure, printed on 300gsm Somerset Textured Soft White paper. From a portfolio of 12 colour etchings, published by The Paragon Press in 2007.
Technique Pop ups A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Price on Application Yes
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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