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Christopher Le Brun
Le Brun’s Fifty Etchings reflect the artist’s enjoyment of the etching process. They are delicately worked images inviting close scrutiny. Le Brun is often inspired by poetry and music. Among the literary sources for Fifty Etchings are John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress and Dante’s Inferno. In this series Le Brun is artist and author at the same time. He even introduces the poet as storyteller in one of the prints. Despite the many sources ,prior knowledge of them is no pre-requisite for enjoyment of his work as its themes and motifs are universal and not fixed in time.
Technique
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.

Christopher Le Brun
Christopher Le Brun RA (born 1951 in Portsmouth) studied at the Slade School of Fine Art (DFA) in London from 1970–74 and at Chelsea School of Art (MA) from 1974–75. Following many exhibitions through the 1980s he was elected to the Royal Academy, London in 1996. He was one of the five artists shortlisted for the Angel of the South, Kent, project in January 2008. His intricate naturalistic etchings of rural subjects recall precursors from Samuel Palmer to Goya and the old masters.

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Availability: Out of stock

£720.00

Fifty Etchings (No 1)

Fifty Etchings 1

Fifty Etchings (No 1)

Etching
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Etching
Edition of 20
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

£720.00

Sheet size
42.5 x 36.5cm
14½ x 16½in

Image size


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Fifty Etchings (No 1)
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Details

Le Brun’s Fifty Etchings reflect the artist’s enjoyment of the etching process. They are delicately worked images inviting close scrutiny. Le Brun is often inspired by poetry and music. Among the literary sources for Fifty Etchings are John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress and Dante’s Inferno. In this series Le Brun is artist and author at the same time. He even introduces the poet as storyteller in one of the prints. Despite the many sources ,prior knowledge of them is no pre-requisite for enjoyment of his work as its themes and motifs are universal and not fixed in time.

Additional Information

First Name Christopher
Last Name Le Brun
Artist Description Christopher Le Brun RA (born 1951 in Portsmouth) studied at the Slade School of Fine Art (DFA) in London from 1970–74 and at Chelsea School of Art (MA) from 1974–75. Following many exhibitions through the 1980s he was elected to the Royal Academy, London in 1996. He was one of the five artists shortlisted for the Angel of the South, Kent, project in January 2008. His intricate naturalistic etchings of rural subjects recall precursors from Samuel Palmer to Goya and the old masters.
Edition of 20
Ed Date 2005
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Etching
Sheet Size 42.5 x 36.5cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 14½ x 16½in
Image Size No
Image Size (inches) No
Technical Description A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Technique Pop ups A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Price on Application No
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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