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Marc Quinn
I've just done a series of paintings of people's irises ...You get an image that is at once incredibly colourful and abstract in a way, but also a complete signifier of identity in the way that DNA is, because an iris doesn't change. You can scan your iris to get into the country now. In the middle you have this black hole, which to me signifies the void and mystery of life. - Marc Quinn continues to explore the theme of nature mediated through human intervention. Science, philosophy, and evolution converge in a time where an individual iris can encompass the world and the world can be seen in one person’s iris.
Technique
From a portfolio of 8 colour etchings, printed on 350gsm Hahnemuhle Bright White paper, published by The paragon Press, 2013

Marc Quinn
Marc Quinn (born in London in 1964) studied history of art at Robinson College, Cambridge, subsequently working extensively in sculpture, paintings and drawings using media ranging from dramatic materials such as ice, blood and even excreta, to the more conventional glass, marble and lead. His marble figures of amputees, a meditation on the idealized figures of Greek and Roman statuary, culminated in a giant statue of a heavily pregnant Alison Lapper, a woman born without arms, on the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square. ‘Self’, a sculpture of the artist's head created from the frozen blood of the artist himself is equally uncompromising.

Availability: In stock

POA

Eye of History 08

Eye of History 08

Eye of History 08

Etching
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Etching
Edition of 69
Signed on the front, numbered on the reverse

POA

Sheet size
90 x 91cm
35 7/16 x 25 13/16 inches

Image size




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Eye of History 08
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Details

I've just done a series of paintings of people's irises ...You get an image that is at once incredibly colourful and abstract in a way, but also a complete signifier of identity in the way that DNA is, because an iris doesn't change. You can scan your iris to get into the country now. In the middle you have this black hole, which to me signifies the void and mystery of life. - Marc Quinn continues to explore the theme of nature mediated through human intervention. Science, philosophy, and evolution converge in a time where an individual iris can encompass the world and the world can be seen in one person’s iris.

Additional Information

First Name Marc
Last Name Quinn
Artist Description Marc Quinn (born in London in 1964) studied history of art at Robinson College, Cambridge, subsequently working extensively in sculpture, paintings and drawings using media ranging from dramatic materials such as ice, blood and even excreta, to the more conventional glass, marble and lead. His marble figures of amputees, a meditation on the idealized figures of Greek and Roman statuary, culminated in a giant statue of a heavily pregnant Alison Lapper, a woman born without arms, on the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square. ‘Self’, a sculpture of the artist's head created from the frozen blood of the artist himself is equally uncompromising.
Edition of 69
Ed Date 2013
Inscriptions Signed on the front, numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Etching
Sheet Size 90 x 91cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 35 7/16 x 25 13/16 inches
Image Size No
Image Size (inches) No
Technical Description From a portfolio of 8 colour etchings, printed on 350gsm Hahnemuhle Bright White paper, published by The paragon Press, 2013
Technique Pop ups A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Price on Application Yes
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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