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Gavin Turk
Gavin Turk’s Right Hand and Forearm is the artist’s first screenprint, based on a previously realized series of photographs of his own arm, hand, leg, torso and head seen in flasks of water. He decided to use one of the images, his hand and forearm. The viewer’s initial reaction may be to see the image as a severed body part preserved in a jar, although the arm is not in fact cut and the caption specifies that it is the artist’s own limb. The artist’s hand is here preserved as if for posterity.
Technique

Thirteen-colour screenprint with varnish, printed on 300gsm Somerset Satin paper. From a portfolio titled Screen published by The Paragon Press in 1997.



Gavin Turk
Gavin Turk (born 1967 in Guildford, Surrey). He attended the Royal College of Art, in London. Early notoriety arose in 1991, when his degree show Cave consisted solely of a whitewashed studio space containing a blue heritage plaque commemorating the artist himself as a sculptor. Turk’s work often involves his own image re-created in the iconic style of a famous person. He has cast himself in a series of life-sized sculptures in the guise of romantic figures such as Sid Vicious, Jean-Paul Marat and the revolutionary Che Guevara.

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POA

Right Hand and Forearm

Right Hand and Forearm

Right Hand and Forearm

Screenprint
Also known as silkscreen. In its simplest form, this is a technique by which the artist blocks out a section of a fine, woven screen (formerly made of silk), which is stretched over a frame. With a squeegee, ink is pressed evenly through the screen on to a sheet of paper beneath. Only the areas of the screen not blocked out will be printed. The artist will use as many of these transparent sheets (separations) as the numbers of colours required in the print, and each sheet must be aligned very carefully with the others. The films are transferred on to the silkscreens via a light-sensitive process: only the areas which are painted by the artist will be blocked out and will not allow ink through.
Screenprint
Edition of 65
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

POA

Sheet size
86 x 68cm
34 x 26¾in

Image size
86 x 68cm
34 x 26¾in


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Right Hand and Forearm
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Details

Gavin Turk’s Right Hand and Forearm is the artist’s first screenprint, based on a previously realized series of photographs of his own arm, hand, leg, torso and head seen in flasks of water. He decided to use one of the images, his hand and forearm. The viewer’s initial reaction may be to see the image as a severed body part preserved in a jar, although the arm is not in fact cut and the caption specifies that it is the artist’s own limb. The artist’s hand is here preserved as if for posterity.

Additional Information

First Name Gavin
Last Name Turk
Artist Description Gavin Turk (born 1967 in Guildford, Surrey). He attended the Royal College of Art, in London. Early notoriety arose in 1991, when his degree show Cave consisted solely of a whitewashed studio space containing a blue heritage plaque commemorating the artist himself as a sculptor. Turk’s work often involves his own image re-created in the iconic style of a famous person. He has cast himself in a series of life-sized sculptures in the guise of romantic figures such as Sid Vicious, Jean-Paul Marat and the revolutionary Che Guevara.
Edition of 65
Ed Date 1992
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Screenprint
Sheet Size 86 x 68cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 34 x 26¾in
Image Size 86 x 68cm
Image Size (inches) 34 x 26¾in
Technical Description

Thirteen-colour screenprint with varnish, printed on 300gsm Somerset Satin paper. From a portfolio titled Screen published by The Paragon Press in 1997.

Technique Pop ups Also known as silkscreen. In its simplest form, this is a technique by which the artist blocks out a section of a fine, woven screen (formerly made of silk), which is stretched over a frame. With a squeegee, ink is pressed evenly through the screen on to a sheet of paper beneath. Only the areas of the screen not blocked out will be printed. The artist will use as many of these transparent sheets (separations) as the numbers of colours required in the print, and each sheet must be aligned very carefully with the others. The films are transferred on to the silkscreens via a light-sensitive process: only the areas which are painted by the artist will be blocked out and will not allow ink through.
Price on Application Yes
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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