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Gillian Carnegie

'I prefer to consider the painting as a thing in the world rather than … as a picture of things in the world.' Gillian Carnegie who was nominated for the Turner Prize n 2005 uses traditional painterly techniques and skills to push contemporary conceptual ideas in her paintings. Statue is one of two etchings by Gillian Carnegie, Statue and Overlook. Both illustrate aspects of the architecturally striking Holly Lodge Estate in Highgate, London built in the 1920s by the Lady Workers Guild specifically to accommodate single women workers, which has provided subject-matter for a large body of paintings by the artist. In Statue the 1920s figure of a young women quietly ­– and self-sufficiently – reading, reflects the feminist perspective of the original estate in supporting independent women, a theme explored elsewhere in Carnegie's work.


Technique
Single etching on 350gsm Hahnemuhle natural paper, published by The Paragon Press 2008.

Gillian Carnegie

Gillian Carnegie (born 1971 in Suffolk) is a graduate of the Camberwell School of Art and of the Royal College of Art, London, 1996–98, where she was taught by Peter Doig. She works in traditional genres – landscape, still life, portraits – using oil paint applied in dense impasto, a technique employed particularly in her Black Square paintings to evoke the mystery of thickly wooded landscapes in winter with patterns formed by interlacing bare branches.


This print is temporarily out of stock, please email info@manifoldeditions.com or call +44 (0)20 7370 7202

Availability: Out of stock

£1,800.00

Statue

Statue

Statue

Etching
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Etching
Edition of 36
Signed and numbered by the artist on the front

£1,800.00

Sheet size
79.5 x 81.0 cm
31 3/4 x 32 in

Image size




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Statue
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Details

'I prefer to consider the painting as a thing in the world rather than … as a picture of things in the world.' Gillian Carnegie who was nominated for the Turner Prize n 2005 uses traditional painterly techniques and skills to push contemporary conceptual ideas in her paintings. Statue is one of two etchings by Gillian Carnegie, Statue and Overlook. Both illustrate aspects of the architecturally striking Holly Lodge Estate in Highgate, London built in the 1920s by the Lady Workers Guild specifically to accommodate single women workers, which has provided subject-matter for a large body of paintings by the artist. In Statue the 1920s figure of a young women quietly ­– and self-sufficiently – reading, reflects the feminist perspective of the original estate in supporting independent women, a theme explored elsewhere in Carnegie's work.

Additional Information

First Name Gillian
Last Name Carnegie
Artist Description

Gillian Carnegie (born 1971 in Suffolk) is a graduate of the Camberwell School of Art and of the Royal College of Art, London, 1996–98, where she was taught by Peter Doig. She works in traditional genres – landscape, still life, portraits – using oil paint applied in dense impasto, a technique employed particularly in her Black Square paintings to evoke the mystery of thickly wooded landscapes in winter with patterns formed by interlacing bare branches.

Edition of 36
Ed Date 2008
Inscriptions Signed and numbered by the artist on the front
Short Technique Etching
Sheet Size 79.5 x 81.0 cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 31 3/4 x 32 in
Image Size No
Image Size (inches) No
Technical Description Single etching on 350gsm Hahnemuhle natural paper, published by The Paragon Press 2008.
Technique Pop ups A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Price on Application No
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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