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Elizabeth Magill

March marks Manifold Editions' third collaboration with Elizabeth Magill. The title of the lithograph refers to its meaning both as a boundary as well as the beginning of spring. March is printed using Magill's favoured technique of lithography. In her painted works, Magill delicately imposes layer after layer of colour until the image takes on an ageless quality, as though coming to us from a distant past. Transforming the subject into the medium of lithograph gives the artist the chance to vary colour composition and texture to create new effects of mood and atmosphere. Eleven lithographic plates and colours were printed on top of one-another to create the final image of March. 


Technique

A lithograph consisting of 11 colour plates, printed on 300 gsm Somerset White Velvet paper. Published by Manifold Editions 2016.



Elizabeth Magill
Elizabeth Magill (born 1959 in Canada) is an Irish painter. She grew up in Northern Ireland and, having studied at the Belfast College of Art and the Slade School of Fine Art, now lives and works in London. Magill is a painter of prodigious versatility and inventiveness whose work has always drawn from a wide range of visual sources. While she often integrates photographic materials and processes into her painting in a number of novel ways, her primary focus has been the medium of painting, in all its bewildering variety. Her first major solo exhibition was at the Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol, in 1990. In the same year she was included in the 'British Art Show', which first introduced many of the most prominent younger British artists to a wider public.

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POA

March

Elizabeth Magill 'March'

March

Lithograph
Lithography – Means, literally, stone drawing. In addition to fine grain lithographic stones, metal plates can also be used for lithography. The method relies on the fact that grease repels water. An image is drawn in a greasy medium on to the stone or plate, which is then dampened with water. Greasy printing ink rolled onto that surface will adhere to the design but be repelled by the damp area. The inked image is transferred to the paper via a press. For large editions, the grease is chemically fixed to the stone and gum arabic, which repels any further grease marks but does not repel water, is applied to the rest of the surface. For colour lithography the artist uses separate stone or plate for each colour required.
Lithograph
Edition of 75
Signed by the artist and numbered on the reverse

POA

Sheet size
46 x 66.4cm
18 x 26 1/5 in

Image size




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March
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Details

March marks Manifold Editions' third collaboration with Elizabeth Magill. The title of the lithograph refers to its meaning both as a boundary as well as the beginning of spring. March is printed using Magill's favoured technique of lithography. In her painted works, Magill delicately imposes layer after layer of colour until the image takes on an ageless quality, as though coming to us from a distant past. Transforming the subject into the medium of lithograph gives the artist the chance to vary colour composition and texture to create new effects of mood and atmosphere. Eleven lithographic plates and colours were printed on top of one-another to create the final image of March. 

Additional Information

First Name Elizabeth
Last Name Magill
Artist Description Elizabeth Magill (born 1959 in Canada) is an Irish painter. She grew up in Northern Ireland and, having studied at the Belfast College of Art and the Slade School of Fine Art, now lives and works in London. Magill is a painter of prodigious versatility and inventiveness whose work has always drawn from a wide range of visual sources. While she often integrates photographic materials and processes into her painting in a number of novel ways, her primary focus has been the medium of painting, in all its bewildering variety. Her first major solo exhibition was at the Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol, in 1990. In the same year she was included in the 'British Art Show', which first introduced many of the most prominent younger British artists to a wider public.
Edition of 75
Ed Date 2016
Inscriptions Signed by the artist and numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Lithograph
Sheet Size 46 x 66.4cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 18 x 26 1/5 in
Image Size No
Image Size (inches) No
Technical Description

A lithograph consisting of 11 colour plates, printed on 300 gsm Somerset White Velvet paper. Published by Manifold Editions 2016.

Technique Pop ups Lithography – Means, literally, stone drawing. In addition to fine grain lithographic stones, metal plates can also be used for lithography. The method relies on the fact that grease repels water. An image is drawn in a greasy medium on to the stone or plate, which is then dampened with water. Greasy printing ink rolled onto that surface will adhere to the design but be repelled by the damp area. The inked image is transferred to the paper via a press. For large editions, the grease is chemically fixed to the stone and gum arabic, which repels any further grease marks but does not repel water, is applied to the rest of the surface. For colour lithography the artist uses separate stone or plate for each colour required.
Price on Application Yes
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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