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Richard Deacon

“I don’t like heavy things, I find them a bit disgusting, they seem to be in your way.” - Richard Deacon Just opened at Tate Britain (until 27 April 2013) is a major exhibition of the work of Richard Deacon, sculptor (he prefers the word 'fabricator'), draughtsman, and spinner of airy structures in a wide range of materials, on paper and in words. Born in Bangor, Wales, in 1949, he attended a number of art schools, coming to notice in the 1980s with a number of equally influential contemporaries including Anish Kapoor, Tony Cragg, Antony Gormley, Richard Long and Bill Woodrow. As one commentator put it 'in different ways, these men reinvented sculpture in a manner both radical and traditional'.


Technique
From a portfolio of 9 etchings, published in 2012 by The Paragon Press

Richard Deacon
Richard Deacon was born in Bangor, Wales and attended a number of art schools before leaving the Royal College of Art, London, in 1977 prior to study part-time at the Chelsea School of Art. Deacon's first one-person show came in 1978 in Brixton, and he was immediately grouped with an influential generation of British sculptors. Among his contemporaries are Anish Kapoor, Tony Cragg, Antony Gormley, Richard Long and ¬Bill Woodrow. As one commentator has put it: “In different ways, these men reinvented sculpture in a manner both radical and traditional.” Deacon’s sculptural works are typically constructed from everyday materials such as laminated plywood, plaster, plastic and clay, but also from shiny metals – in fact, he prefers to call himself a ‘fabricator’ rather than a ‘sculptor’. His pieces, large and small, recall flowing, organic forms, at scales both intimate, for gallery installations, and substantial, for exterior public works. First nominated for the Turner Prize in 1984, he was a winner in 1987. In parallel with his reputation as a sculptor, Deacon is also recognised for his skills as a draughtsman whose light, airy but tensile drawings echo the free, open-weave character of his three-dimensional works. In 2007, he represented Wales at the Venice Biennale, and in January 2008 was one of the five artists shortlisted for the Angel of the South project. He is represented by Lisson Gallery, London and Milan; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York; Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin; Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Salzburg and Paris; and LA Louver Gallery, Los Angeles.

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Etching
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Etching
Edition of 38
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

POA

Sheet size
57 x 76cm
22.5 x 30inches

Image size
n/a



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“I don’t like heavy things, I find them a bit disgusting, they seem to be in your way.” - Richard Deacon Just opened at Tate Britain (until 27 April 2013) is a major exhibition of the work of Richard Deacon, sculptor (he prefers the word 'fabricator'), draughtsman, and spinner of airy structures in a wide range of materials, on paper and in words. Born in Bangor, Wales, in 1949, he attended a number of art schools, coming to notice in the 1980s with a number of equally influential contemporaries including Anish Kapoor, Tony Cragg, Antony Gormley, Richard Long and Bill Woodrow. As one commentator put it 'in different ways, these men reinvented sculpture in a manner both radical and traditional'.

Additional Information

First Name Richard
Last Name Deacon
Artist Description Richard Deacon was born in Bangor, Wales and attended a number of art schools before leaving the Royal College of Art, London, in 1977 prior to study part-time at the Chelsea School of Art. Deacon's first one-person show came in 1978 in Brixton, and he was immediately grouped with an influential generation of British sculptors. Among his contemporaries are Anish Kapoor, Tony Cragg, Antony Gormley, Richard Long and ¬Bill Woodrow. As one commentator has put it: “In different ways, these men reinvented sculpture in a manner both radical and traditional.” Deacon’s sculptural works are typically constructed from everyday materials such as laminated plywood, plaster, plastic and clay, but also from shiny metals – in fact, he prefers to call himself a ‘fabricator’ rather than a ‘sculptor’. His pieces, large and small, recall flowing, organic forms, at scales both intimate, for gallery installations, and substantial, for exterior public works. First nominated for the Turner Prize in 1984, he was a winner in 1987. In parallel with his reputation as a sculptor, Deacon is also recognised for his skills as a draughtsman whose light, airy but tensile drawings echo the free, open-weave character of his three-dimensional works. In 2007, he represented Wales at the Venice Biennale, and in January 2008 was one of the five artists shortlisted for the Angel of the South project. He is represented by Lisson Gallery, London and Milan; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York; Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin; Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Salzburg and Paris; and LA Louver Gallery, Los Angeles.
Edition of 38
Ed Date 2012
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Etching
Sheet Size 57 x 76cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 22.5 x 30inches
Image Size n/a
Image Size (inches) No
Technical Description From a portfolio of 9 etchings, published in 2012 by The Paragon Press
Technique Pop ups A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Price on Application Yes
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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