Sign in   Basket  

Currency
Lisa Milroy
Coins, rocks and butterflies all featured in Milroy’s earlier paintings. They are small, hand-held objects, and are all collectable. She chose the objects for the print project on the basis of the contrasts between their inherent qualities. By depicting standard objects in grid-like patterns and in an emphatically direct way, giving equal weight to each element and eliminating any sense of space or location, Milroy draws attention to the integrity of the object itself.
Technique

A softground etching with colour aquatint and extra hardground definition. Each print made from three separate copper plates. Printed on 300gsm Somerset Satin paper. One of a series of three prints individually entitled Rocks, Butterflies and Coins published by The Paragon Press in 1994.



Lisa Milroy
Lisa Milroy (born 1959 in Vancouver) studied at the Sorbonne (1977–78) before attending St Martin's School of Art (1978–79) and University of London (1979–82). Milroy lives and works in the UK, and was made a Royal Academician in 2005. Her work presents everyday objects, often arranged in grids, groups, lines, rows and columns. This pared-down approach was also utilized in her travel paintings of the 1990s, which concentrated on building façades. The repetition of windows and other architectural elements echo the rows and patterns of objects found in her earlier paintings

Availability: In stock

£600.00

Rocks 1

Rocks 1

Rocks 1

Etching
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Etching
Edition of 30
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

£600.00

Sheet size
30 x 30 cm
11¾ x 11¾

Image size
n/a

Add to basket

Zoom Zoom
Zoom Out

Expanded view

More Views

Rocks 1
Add to wishlist

Details

Coins, rocks and butterflies all featured in Milroy’s earlier paintings. They are small, hand-held objects, and are all collectable. She chose the objects for the print project on the basis of the contrasts between their inherent qualities. By depicting standard objects in grid-like patterns and in an emphatically direct way, giving equal weight to each element and eliminating any sense of space or location, Milroy draws attention to the integrity of the object itself.

Additional Information

First Name Lisa
Last Name Milroy
Artist Description Lisa Milroy (born 1959 in Vancouver) studied at the Sorbonne (1977–78) before attending St Martin's School of Art (1978–79) and University of London (1979–82). Milroy lives and works in the UK, and was made a Royal Academician in 2005. Her work presents everyday objects, often arranged in grids, groups, lines, rows and columns. This pared-down approach was also utilized in her travel paintings of the 1990s, which concentrated on building façades. The repetition of windows and other architectural elements echo the rows and patterns of objects found in her earlier paintings
Edition of 30
Ed Date 1994
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Etching
Sheet Size 30 x 30 cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 11¾ x 11¾
Image Size n/a
Image Size (inches) No
Technical Description

A softground etching with colour aquatint and extra hardground definition. Each print made from three separate copper plates. Printed on 300gsm Somerset Satin paper. One of a series of three prints individually entitled Rocks, Butterflies and Coins published by The Paragon Press in 1994.

Technique Pop ups A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Price on Application No
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

Product Tags

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.