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George Shaw
The hand-drawn soft-ground etching technique, where the image is printed in reverse to the image drawn onto the plate, renders these everyday scenes strikingly unfamiliar, an effect which the artist found very attractive. Shaw draws his subject matter from the Tile Hill estate, near Coventry, where he grew up. Working from an archive of photographs he took of the estate, Shaw constantly revisits the scenes of his adolescence. The Terminus was the second image Shaw worked on. The subject of the curved road intrigued Shaw, because it is continuous line, going in and out of the image: ‘This is clearly what the images is about. It’s been chopped in half – you’ve been prevented from turning round – the way the image is cropped the terminus ends – it’s the end – you have been denied the ability to come back round, which symbolizes time in a way – memory – time only works in one way: you can’t turn round’.
Technique
Softground etching; two plates, one with pink ground and second with the softground etching. Printed on 270gsm Magnami Handmade Ivory wove paper. Published in 2005.

George Shaw

George Shaw (born 1966 in Coventry) studied at Sheffield Polytechnic and later at the Royal College of Art, London, where he was taught by Peter Doig. Shaw is noted for his highly detailed naturalistic approach and English suburban subject matter. His obsession with the suburban estate of Tile Hill, Coventry, in which he grew up, is documented in an archive of over 10,000 photographs of the area and expressed in minutely detailed paintings of landscapes both seemingly detached and at the same time deeply felt, executed in his favourite medium of Humbrol enamel paint (familiar to all Airfix plane modellers). Shaw became known to a wider public in 2003 through his participation in the Tate Triennial Days Like These at Tate Britain. Shaw had a major retrospective at The Baltic Centre of Contemporary Art, Gateshead, in 2011, and was nominated for the 2011 Turner Prize.


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POA

The Terminus

The Terminus

The Terminus

Etching
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Etching
Edition of 44
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

POA

Sheet size
64.7 x 89cm
25½ x 35in

Image size
50.6 x 75.5cm
20 x 29¾in


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The Terminus
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Details

The hand-drawn soft-ground etching technique, where the image is printed in reverse to the image drawn onto the plate, renders these everyday scenes strikingly unfamiliar, an effect which the artist found very attractive. Shaw draws his subject matter from the Tile Hill estate, near Coventry, where he grew up. Working from an archive of photographs he took of the estate, Shaw constantly revisits the scenes of his adolescence. The Terminus was the second image Shaw worked on. The subject of the curved road intrigued Shaw, because it is continuous line, going in and out of the image: ‘This is clearly what the images is about. It’s been chopped in half – you’ve been prevented from turning round – the way the image is cropped the terminus ends – it’s the end – you have been denied the ability to come back round, which symbolizes time in a way – memory – time only works in one way: you can’t turn round’.

Additional Information

First Name George
Last Name Shaw
Artist Description

George Shaw (born 1966 in Coventry) studied at Sheffield Polytechnic and later at the Royal College of Art, London, where he was taught by Peter Doig. Shaw is noted for his highly detailed naturalistic approach and English suburban subject matter. His obsession with the suburban estate of Tile Hill, Coventry, in which he grew up, is documented in an archive of over 10,000 photographs of the area and expressed in minutely detailed paintings of landscapes both seemingly detached and at the same time deeply felt, executed in his favourite medium of Humbrol enamel paint (familiar to all Airfix plane modellers). Shaw became known to a wider public in 2003 through his participation in the Tate Triennial Days Like These at Tate Britain. Shaw had a major retrospective at The Baltic Centre of Contemporary Art, Gateshead, in 2011, and was nominated for the 2011 Turner Prize.

Edition of 44
Ed Date 2005
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Etching
Sheet Size 64.7 x 89cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 25½ x 35in
Image Size 50.6 x 75.5cm
Image Size (inches) 20 x 29¾in
Technical Description Softground etching; two plates, one with pink ground and second with the softground etching. Printed on 270gsm Magnami Handmade Ivory wove paper. Published in 2005.
Technique Pop ups A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Price on Application Yes
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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