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Marc Quinn
Quinn's orchid prints explore two persisting leitmotifs of his work – beauty and death. They investigate beauty as it manifests itself in the natural world through flowers, and how it is mediated through human intervention. For his flower pieces Quinn makes various installations selecting a wide range of species from different continents that would never bloom at the same time. The installations are photographed and subsequently digitally reworked by the artist before printing. Quinn captures these species in their prime, rescuing them as it were from natural decay. He intentionally accentuates the voluptuous nature of the plants and flowers. 'Orchids are like perfectly evolved little sculptures in themselves, they're full of colour, interesting shapes and beauty. Even though they are a plant's reproductive organs, they pun on human ones too. They make you realise it is colour, life and sexuality that keeps the world turning'.
Technique
Digital print with silkscreen glaze. Printed on 330gsm Somerset Satin Enhanced paper. Published by Manifold Editions 2012.

Marc Quinn
Marc Quinn (born in London in 1964) studied history of art at Robinson College, Cambridge, subsequently working extensively in sculpture, paintings and drawings using media ranging from dramatic materials such as ice, blood and even excreta, to the more conventional glass, marble and lead. His marble figures of amputees, a meditation on the idealized figures of Greek and Roman statuary, culminated in a giant statue of a heavily pregnant Alison Lapper, a woman born without arms, on the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square. ‘Self’, a sculpture of the artist's head created from the frozen blood of the artist himself is equally uncompromising.

Availability: In stock

£1,200.00

Under the Volcano

Under the Volcano

Under the Volcano

Digital print
The principle behind ink-jet printing was established over 100 years ago. Recent developments in piezoelectric technology have resulted in increasingly high-resolution colour prints. When subjected to an electrical charge, the piezoelectric crystal expands, forcing ink through an array of microscopic holes onto the surface of the paper or other surface. The resolution of the print is significantly enhanced if the paper is coated with an impermeable layer to keep the droplet on the surface. Until recently, ink-jet printers could only use dye inks, but improvements to the ink and print heads are resulting in pigment inks. These have reduced colour range but increased life-expectancy.
Digital print
Edition of 150
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

£1,200.00

Sheet size
67 x 100cmcm
26¼ x 39¼

Image size
96.4 x 63cm
33¾ x 27¾in
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Under the Volcano
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Details

Quinn's orchid prints explore two persisting leitmotifs of his work – beauty and death. They investigate beauty as it manifests itself in the natural world through flowers, and how it is mediated through human intervention. For his flower pieces Quinn makes various installations selecting a wide range of species from different continents that would never bloom at the same time. The installations are photographed and subsequently digitally reworked by the artist before printing. Quinn captures these species in their prime, rescuing them as it were from natural decay. He intentionally accentuates the voluptuous nature of the plants and flowers. 'Orchids are like perfectly evolved little sculptures in themselves, they're full of colour, interesting shapes and beauty. Even though they are a plant's reproductive organs, they pun on human ones too. They make you realise it is colour, life and sexuality that keeps the world turning'.

Additional Information

First Name Marc
Last Name Quinn
Artist Description Marc Quinn (born in London in 1964) studied history of art at Robinson College, Cambridge, subsequently working extensively in sculpture, paintings and drawings using media ranging from dramatic materials such as ice, blood and even excreta, to the more conventional glass, marble and lead. His marble figures of amputees, a meditation on the idealized figures of Greek and Roman statuary, culminated in a giant statue of a heavily pregnant Alison Lapper, a woman born without arms, on the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square. ‘Self’, a sculpture of the artist's head created from the frozen blood of the artist himself is equally uncompromising.
Edition of 150
Ed Date 2012
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Digital print
Sheet Size 67 x 100cmcm
Sheet Size (Inches) 26¼ x 39¼
Image Size 96.4 x 63cm
Image Size (inches) 33¾ x 27¾in
Technical Description Digital print with silkscreen glaze. Printed on 330gsm Somerset Satin Enhanced paper. Published by Manifold Editions 2012.
Technique Pop ups The principle behind ink-jet printing was established over 100 years ago. Recent developments in piezoelectric technology have resulted in increasingly high-resolution colour prints. When subjected to an electrical charge, the piezoelectric crystal expands, forcing ink through an array of microscopic holes onto the surface of the paper or other surface. The resolution of the print is significantly enhanced if the paper is coated with an impermeable layer to keep the droplet on the surface. Until recently, ink-jet printers could only use dye inks, but improvements to the ink and print heads are resulting in pigment inks. These have reduced colour range but increased life-expectancy.
Price on Application No
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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