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Marc Quinn
Quinn views his 'Iris' paintings as ‘doors of perception’, fusing the mystery of life with beauty and colour. A seductive large-scale print of a real person's iris, selected from a series of photographs taken by Quinn with a special close-up lens. The iris is one of the few external parts of the body which are highly coloured, the only internal organ you can see from the outside, and the only one which has strong vivid colours of the inside of the body, the strong reds, blues, greens, yellows and oranges. Blue Planet is like a leakage of the vivid interior world of the body to the monochrome world of the skin.
Technique
Digital print with silkscreen glaze. Printed on 330gsm Somerset Satin Enhanced paper. Published by Manifold Editions 2012.

Marc Quinn
Born in London (1964), Marc Quinn studied History of Art at Cambridge, subsequently creating sculpture in a challenging range of media. His early series of marble figures of people who have lost their limbs or were born with a disability culminated in a giant statue of a heavily pregnant Alison Lapper, a woman born without arms, on the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square, London, in 2005. ‘Self’, a sculpture of the artist's head created from his own frozen blood, is equally uncompromising: first exhibited in 1991, there have been several iterations since. In 2014, the film ‘Marc Quinn: Making Waves’ revealed the extent to which Quinn’s work has become globally recognized and collected, coinciding with his preparations for ‘The Toxic Sublime’ at White Cube, Bermondsey, in 2015. More recently, Quinn has had a major installation of his sculpture in ‘Drawn from Life’ at London’s Sir John Soane Museum.

Availability: In stock

POA

Blue Planet

Blue Planet

Blue Planet

Digitial print
The principle behind ink-jet printing was established over 100 years ago. Recent developments in piezoelectric technology have resulted in increasingly high-resolution colour prints. When subjected to an electrical charge, the piezoelectric crystal expands, forcing ink through an array of microscopic holes onto the surface of the paper or other surface. The resolution of the print is significantly enhanced if the paper is coated with an impermeable layer to keep the droplet on the surface. Until recently, ink-jet printers could only use dye inks, but improvements to the ink and print heads are resulting in pigment inks. These have reduced colour range but increased life-expectancy.
Digitial print
Edition of 65
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

POA

Sheet size
104 x 102cm
40¾ x 40¼ in

Image size
n/a
n/a


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Blue Planet
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Details

Quinn views his 'Iris' paintings as ‘doors of perception’, fusing the mystery of life with beauty and colour. A seductive large-scale print of a real person's iris, selected from a series of photographs taken by Quinn with a special close-up lens. The iris is one of the few external parts of the body which are highly coloured, the only internal organ you can see from the outside, and the only one which has strong vivid colours of the inside of the body, the strong reds, blues, greens, yellows and oranges. Blue Planet is like a leakage of the vivid interior world of the body to the monochrome world of the skin.

Additional Information

First Name Marc
Last Name Quinn
Artist Description Born in London (1964), Marc Quinn studied History of Art at Cambridge, subsequently creating sculpture in a challenging range of media. His early series of marble figures of people who have lost their limbs or were born with a disability culminated in a giant statue of a heavily pregnant Alison Lapper, a woman born without arms, on the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square, London, in 2005. ‘Self’, a sculpture of the artist's head created from his own frozen blood, is equally uncompromising: first exhibited in 1991, there have been several iterations since. In 2014, the film ‘Marc Quinn: Making Waves’ revealed the extent to which Quinn’s work has become globally recognized and collected, coinciding with his preparations for ‘The Toxic Sublime’ at White Cube, Bermondsey, in 2015. More recently, Quinn has had a major installation of his sculpture in ‘Drawn from Life’ at London’s Sir John Soane Museum.
Edition of 65
Ed Date 2012
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Digitial print
Sheet Size 104 x 102cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 40¾ x 40¼ in
Image Size n/a
Image Size (inches) n/a
Technical Description Digital print with silkscreen glaze. Printed on 330gsm Somerset Satin Enhanced paper. Published by Manifold Editions 2012.
Technique Pop ups The principle behind ink-jet printing was established over 100 years ago. Recent developments in piezoelectric technology have resulted in increasingly high-resolution colour prints. When subjected to an electrical charge, the piezoelectric crystal expands, forcing ink through an array of microscopic holes onto the surface of the paper or other surface. The resolution of the print is significantly enhanced if the paper is coated with an impermeable layer to keep the droplet on the surface. Until recently, ink-jet printers could only use dye inks, but improvements to the ink and print heads are resulting in pigment inks. These have reduced colour range but increased life-expectancy.
Price on Application Yes
Display Custom Popup No
Custom pop up link Title No
Custom Popup Title No
Custom Pop up Description No

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