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Elizabeth Magill
Magill’s Venice series represents the artist’s first foray into etching. The imagery is based on photographs Magill took during a trip to Venice in 2008. Just as in her paintings in which the artist puts on layer after layer of paint, in this series the etchings are constructed by printing multiple plates for each etching.
Technique
Etching: three plates per print, one photo-etching, two aquatint printed on 300gsm Somerset White Velvet paper. From a series of 6 etchings entitled Venice published by The Paragon Press in 2007.

Elizabeth Magill
Born in Canada (1959), Elizabeth Magill grew up in Northern Ireland and, having studied at the Belfast College of Art and the Slade School of Fine Art, now lives and works in London. Her subtle, painterly, landscapes often evolve from a combination of photographic precursors and drawings. As well as solo shows in Ireland, Britain, Germany, France and Spain, she is represented in a number of significant collections, including the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin, the Arts Council of England, Southampton City Art Gallery, the British Council, and the National Gallery of Australia. The year 2017 has been busy, with a solo show in April at Wilkinson Gallery, London, another at Limerick City Art Gallery, and more shows to come at the RHA gallery, Dublin (opening January 18, 2018), and the Ulster Museum (opening May, 2018).

Availability: In stock

POA

Venice - San Michele

Venice - San Michele

Venice - San Michele

Etching
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Etching
Edition of 40
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

POA

Sheet size
45.2 x 55.3cm
17¾ x 21¾in

Image size
28.5 x 40.2cm
11¼ x 15¾in


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Venice - San Michele
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Details

Magill’s Venice series represents the artist’s first foray into etching. The imagery is based on photographs Magill took during a trip to Venice in 2008. Just as in her paintings in which the artist puts on layer after layer of paint, in this series the etchings are constructed by printing multiple plates for each etching.

Additional Information

First Name Elizabeth
Last Name Magill
Artist Description Born in Canada (1959), Elizabeth Magill grew up in Northern Ireland and, having studied at the Belfast College of Art and the Slade School of Fine Art, now lives and works in London. Her subtle, painterly, landscapes often evolve from a combination of photographic precursors and drawings. As well as solo shows in Ireland, Britain, Germany, France and Spain, she is represented in a number of significant collections, including the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin, the Arts Council of England, Southampton City Art Gallery, the British Council, and the National Gallery of Australia. The year 2017 has been busy, with a solo show in April at Wilkinson Gallery, London, another at Limerick City Art Gallery, and more shows to come at the RHA gallery, Dublin (opening January 18, 2018), and the Ulster Museum (opening May, 2018).
Edition of 40
Ed Date 2007
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Etching
Sheet Size 45.2 x 55.3cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 17¾ x 21¾in
Image Size 28.5 x 40.2cm
Image Size (inches) 11¼ x 15¾in
Technical Description Etching: three plates per print, one photo-etching, two aquatint printed on 300gsm Somerset White Velvet paper. From a series of 6 etchings entitled Venice published by The Paragon Press in 2007.
Technique Pop ups A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Price on Application Yes
Display Custom Popup No
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